When is a Snow Day Not Exactly a Snow Day?

Keuka College students may not be in class, but that doesn’t mean they’re not learning.


Tuesday, February 16, 2021
1 min. read

Keuka College students may not be in class, but that doesn’t mean they’re not learning.

As a winter storm pummeled the region today, Keuka College pivoted to a new weapon in its educational arsenal: A remote-instruction snow day.

Remote learning can be relaxing and effective since online video calls are easily accessible.

— Sydney Bloom ’21

Call it a silver lining of the ongoing global pandemic.

Because students and faculty have become so adept at remote instruction over the past year, it’s now possible to seamlessly pivot from traditional face-to-face learning to online classes, preventing the loss of valuable instruction time.

“Moving to remote instruction rather than canceling classes during hazardous weather is a new concept for Keuka College this semester,” said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Brad Fuster.

As with a snow day, students are not required to go to class, and faculty and most staff do not report to campus. But all classes are held online at their regular times. 

And that’s just fine with students.

“Online classes are good because all the information is easy to find and is available online,” said Bradley McKnight ’22. “I like that because I can see exactly what I need to get done and when it needs to be done.”

That doesn’t mean students aren’t eager to get back to the classroom.

Moving to remote instruction rather than canceling classes during hazardous weather is a new concept for Keuka College this semester.

— Dr. Brad Fuster, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

“Remote learning can be relaxing and effective since online video calls are easily accessible, but having in-person classes is what makes Keuka College a unique and great school,” said Sydney Bloom ’21. “I love being able to collaborate with my classmates and having a one-on-one relationship with my professors.”

Dr. Fuster said the College will continue to declare traditional snow days, which he called “an opportunity to catch up on work, read a good book, and otherwise rest and rejuvenate,” but since the semester is just over two weeks old, he added, there was a desire not to disrupt instruction.

In the meantime, the College is scheduled to return to on-campus instruction on Wednesday.